NOMOPHOBIA

Al Musser, VANISH founder

Al Musser, VANISH founder

. . . or why this might be important to those with hearing loss……..

One of the most irritating social situations for those of us with hearing loss is trying to understand conversations at a busy restaurant or a noisy cocktail party. Modern hearing devices are amazingly clever enough to help you sort out sounds and frequency and understand most, some or none of what’s going on.

Even if you can speech read, it’s impossible to cover the jumble of lips that are producing sound and make sense of it. And so even though we have not the slightest clue about what’s being said, we become adept at nodding our head, putting on a big smile and laughingly agree with what we thought we heard.

Is This You?

Is This You?

Speaker in large crowd: “ I think we should exile to Kazakhstan all people who can’t hear, are over sixty and balding” My response: “a big smile and a resounding Yes! Yes! Yes!”

One of the most helpful technological developments is that now, with the right hearing aids, you can make your I-phone work as a remote microphone. Tell your phone with an “app” you want to pick up only the voices at your table and it will send those directly to your ears. Get a phone call? Tell your phone to send it directly to your hearing aids. Riding in a noisy car with a passenger you can’t hear? Give them your I phone, it will pick up their voice and send it to your hearing aids. Can’t hear the movie? Turn on your I phone (but disable the phone part) and you’ve got your own private microphone.

Smartest Phone

Smartest Phone

The nomophobia thing? That’s the new clinical diagnosis for people afraid of losing their I phone!

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no-mo-pho-bia = no mobile phone phobia

 

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